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Résumé Tips From Hiring Managers

October 29, 2018

You need a new job or you need your first “real” job to start paying off those student loans. For most people that means you need a résumé. If you really want to get noticed, or simply not get rejected, you need a good résumé. We talked to hiring and talent acquisition managers, C-suite executives and other really smart people to bring you the best advice. We want to help you get that dream job.

 

Number one

 

This may sound cliché, but everyone told us proofing is the best thing you can do. Go over it with a fine-tooth comb and have others look at it, too. A grammar, spelling or formatting error on your résumé shows you don’t pay attention to detail. In addition to not paying attention to detail it could give the impression that you simply don’t care. Nothing is a bigger turnoff to a potential employer.

 

Objectives – out

 

If someone is looking at your résumé, they know you are looking for a job. You don’t need to tell them in an objective statement. Instead, start with a short summary statement. The summary statement could discuss why you’re the best candidate for this job. The summary should be supported by your previous work experience. Below is an example from Columbia University Center for Career Education:

 

Example-  Publishing executive with multi-faceted background encompassing international licensing and brand management. Developed specialties in editorial planning, global marketing strategy, and design. Managed multiple projects simultaneously and eciently by overseeing the daily operations of 17 magazine titles worldwide. Proven ability to develop strong relationships across cultures and to provide decisive team leadership in a fast-paced environment.”

 

 

Tinder® Experience a Plus

 

Putting together a résumé can be a lot like putting together a dating profile. It’s a delicate balance of putting your best traits forward without overselling yourself. Getting too cute or creative can come off as cheesy or desperate. Never lie or misrepresent your role or accomplishments. Lying or misrepresentation might get you a date, but it won’t make for a successful relationship.

 

 

  • Show the numbers. “Don’t just tell me you worked on something, tell me you improved something by 20%,” one person told us. Be specific and measurable if possible.
  • Do the math; your current job may not track the results you want to include. It’s okay to do the math yourself to help tell your story. Just make sure it’s accurate.
  • Problem, action, result. Bullet points should follow this format if possible. Be specific about what you did, not what your job is/was. (see example in next bullet)
  • Avoid passive job functions like, “Oversaw workforce of 8 employees dedicated to customer service.” Instead go with something like “Mentored, trained and managed daily activities for 8 customer service representatives resulting in an 15% improvement in average likelihood to recommend score among customers.”
  • Skip the basics. Oh, you’re proficient at MS Office? Everyone is, and even if you’re not it’s fairly expected. Include more specialized software or instances where you might be highly proficient. Like data modeling in excel for example. That’s okay.
  • Only include personal interests or hobbies if they are relevant to the position.
  • Don’t include social handles (other than LinkedIn®) if they aren’t relevant to the position.

 

 

Keywords and customization

 

  • Always customize language in your résumé to fit the job description you’re applying for. If they use specific jargon, work it into your résumé because that’s what they’ll be looking for.
  • Don’t overdo it with keywords. A lot of bigger companies use keyword scanning software, so it’s important to include them, but they’re also used to spot the overuse of these words as well.
  • Make sure you’re speaking their language. It’s okay to translate titles. If you have a non-traditional job title like “customer success advocate” consider replacing that for industry standard language like “account manager” or whatever is appropriate.

 

Contact Info

 

We got conflicting advice on what to do with contact information. Some people told us you might want to leave off details like your city if you don’t live in that city because some employers might prefer a local candidate. Conversely, you might want to include it if you are local. Some say that phone number and email are important, while others say the trend is moving toward just including your LinkedIn® address. We like this last option because it can leave room for more important things, but we recognize this may be highly situational.

 

 

Design and formatting

 

Don’t make dumb mistakes that get your résumé thrown off the pile. A good design in the résumé world is not typically cutting edge. Yes, if it’s too plain it may get overlooked. The best résumés are usually form over function. The main purpose is to make it easy to read. People don’t typically spend a lot of time with a résumé, so if they have to work to read it, it will get tossed aside. It should look good on screen and on paper.

  • Use a template. You can search for templates or you can use résumé building sites like uptowork.com. Certain industries may prefer certain styles. Do your research.
  • Keep it simple. Choose one simple easy to read font. Never something goofy like Comic Sans. Yes, more than one person told us they got a résumé with Comic Sans.
  • In general, it’s best not to go overboard with colors, symbols or lines.
  • Stick to one page. Especially early in your career. Don’t overstuff it with irrelevant information. Save some for the interview.
  • Make sure you’re using the proper tense. Past for old jobs and achievements. Present for current.
  • Don’t include a picture. Unless you’re a model or your picture is relevant for some reason.
  • Save it as a PDF file. Word files don’t always translate well. Especially if there’s a lot of special formatting. A PDF will be more consistent between computers.
  • Make your filename [First Name/Last Name.résumé] (ie. John Smith.résumé.pdf) not Jonrésumé2019.pdf.

 

 

The résumé is only part of the equation.

 

The best résumé is only valuable when people see it. A lot of candidates are hired through referrals, relationship, and persistence. Work as hard or harder on getting your résumé in the right hands as you do on your actual résumé. Also, here’s a few more tips away from the résumé.

  • Make sure you put as much thought into your LinkedIn® profile as you do your résumé. Make sure there are no mistakes and it reflects on you the same way your résumé does. One executive told us this is equally, if not more important than a résumé, especially for networking. They said, an email has a good chance of going unnoticed, but a message on LinkedIn® almost never does.
  • Social Scrub. Take a serious look at your social channels, even if they are not listed. Employers often take a look when they get serious about a candidate. Many told us they have had social media tip the scales the wrong way for a prospective employee. Take down posts you think might be offensive or give the wrong impression.

 

You’re hired now what?!

 

Great, but don’t forget your résumé. Most of us don’t stay in the same job forever. Your next job often doesn’t come around when you expect it, so keep your résumé fresh. It’s a good idea to write down your accomplishments when they happen so when you need it, you’re ready.

 

3 Steps for Negotiating a Salary

 

NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites
Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.

2018-12-06
The 4 Most Common Causes of Physician Burnout in 2018

This is Part II of our three-part research series with LeverageRx, an online financial marketplace exclusively for doctors.   Changes in healthcare often have a domino effect on employees and patients. The medical profession has to evolve and change to share the latest in medical findings. But what if those changes cause the people that patients depend on to burnout? Recent changes in the industry are taking a serious toll on physicians. Medscape’s annual Physician Lifestyle Report surveyed more than 15,000 physicians from 29 specialties. Of survey respondents, 42% of physicians reported burnout.   Could change in the healthcare industry be boosting the number of physicians who experience burnout? What factors could be contributing to physician burnout?Let's take a closer look at the four most common causes of physician burnout in 2018.  

Relationships

Mergers and acquisitions are on the rise in healthcare. In fact, they were up 57% in the first half of 2018 compared to the same period of 2017 per The Wall Street Journal.   Nowadays, it can be rare to find a physician who isn’t practicing within a large healthcare group. Due to the rising costs of owning your own practice, joining a healthcare system may seem like a no-brainer. For physicians, it means less to worry about when it comes to things like:  
  • New technology.
  • Medical equipment.
  • Insurance.
  But does joining a healthcare system alleviate physician burnout? Or could it actually be adding to it?   On one hand, these large healthcare systems can be a great fit for physicians:  
  • With no time to run their own practice.
  • Looking to take on less risk.
  On the other hand, large healthcare systems can be a source of stress for patients. And that patient stress often ends up taking a toll on their physician.   Healthcare systems tend to increase efficiency by utilizing multiple locations and specialties. For patients, this may have removed the basic comforts of seeing a local physician. Instead of calling the office’s front desk, patients pass through large, automated phone systems. Other factors that may cause stress for ill patients seeking treatment include changes in:  
  • Location.
  • Hours of operation.
  • In-network insurance.
  As physicians advance in their careers, their workload grows. This often times means they can no longer communicate with patients like they once could. The endless chase for answers can cause damage to the relationship a physician may have spent years building.   33% of physicians surveyed said that they're easily exasperated with patients. 32% said they are less engaged with patients due to physician burnout.   Could this loss of loyalty be adding to physician burnout?  

Loyalty

  When patients lack loyalty to physicians, this causes a lack of enthusiasm for physicians. Patient loyalty may decrease due to the healthcare system and the absence of a personal touch.   An underlying reason for the lack of patient loyalty to physicians is insurance. For patients and healthcare systems, coverage is subject to constant change. As of 2018, many health systems see this as a concern for their business. As a result, many have transitioned from volume-based care to value-based care. Utilizing a value-based strategy should help health systems rebuild lost patient relationships. Value-based care restores relationships by offering patients easier communication and more convenience. This shift to a value-based strategy will affect physicians in several ways, including:  
  • An increasing focus on technology.
  • A more holistic approach to health in the community.
  Due in part to this lagging patient loyalty, physicians do not receive the praise they once did. For most physicians, the reward they seek goes beyond their paycheck. Patient approval justifies their hard work as time well spent. This attitude shift toward the medical profession raises concerns when considering the results of a recent Prophet/GE study. It found a staggering 81 percent of consumers are unsatisfied with their healthcare experience.  

Emphasis on Profits

  For many healthcare systems, a value-based strategy may cause additional physician burnout. This strategy requires physicians to perform more administrative tasks, which takes away from patient care.   For example, if testing is required under this type of strategy, it would be imperative to explain as to why the additional testing is needed. Not only is there more paperwork that falls on the responsibility of physicians, but there could be less staffed physicians. In addition, health systems routinely only contract with a percentage of physicians of one type of specialty. This lack of staff depth leads to:  
  • Longer regular working hours.
  • More overtime hours.
  • More on-call duties.
  The medical profession already faces a great deal of pressure and stress. Add to this a lack of work-life balance, and naturally, they are at a greater risk for depression and burnout.   Health systems are often for-profit based organizations. Like any industry, the desire to drive bottom lines is huge.   According to the 2018 Medscape compensation report, physician salaries have been on a steady incline. Supply and demand for physicians is as strong as ever. But for physicians who feel overworked and undervalued, the minor salary bump may not be enough. According to the Medscape National Burnout & Depression Report of 2018, here are the top three contributing factors:  
  1. Too many bureaucratic tasks (paperwork) – 56%
  2. Spending too many hours at work – 39%
  3. Insufficient compensation – 24%
 

Student Loan Debt

  Physicians illustrate a concern for financial wellness.   To pursue a career in medicine, most need student loans to finance their education. In turn, seventy-five percent of medical school graduates begin practice with debt. What's worse is that the average medical school grad carries $192,000 in debt. It’s no surprise that the burden to pay off these loans can cause extreme financial strain for young physicians. And although many overcome to lead successful careers, some never fully recover.   According to the Medscape Physician Wealth and Debt Report of 2018, most school loans are paid off by age 50. Thirty-two percent of physicians surveyed were still paying down their own student loan debt from medical school.   With so many physicians paying down student loan debt, it's no wonder their financial outlook is unique. More money for student loan payments means less money for lifestyle spending and retirement planning. This financial stress extends beyond large monthly payments, too. It also impacts their experience as first-time homebuyers.   In addition to the long hours physicians typically work, they now have little money to add to their budgets. In fact, 24% of physicians in the Medscape survey said that insufficient compensation contributed to their burnout. And when asked what could be done to reduce burnout, 35% said: “increase compensation to avoid financial stress."   In a large healthcare system, it can be tough to stand out. Most CFOs are not closely involved with physicians. This lack of engagement means physicians are less likely to get the financial resources they need. Most raises and bonuses in large healthcare systems come at a preset rate or a generic structure. As a physician, refinancing student loans can offer significant cost savings.   Depending on the repayment plan, this is possible both:  
  • Over the life of the loan.
  • On a monthly basis.
  Large health systems should consider offering student loan debt assistance to physicians and other employees.  

Key takeaways

  Like student loan debt, physician burnout is a crisis affecting the healthcare industry today. Based on our research, the former is actually fueling the latter. But that's not the only culprit. Other leading causes include:  
  • Less meaningful relationships.
  • A decline in patient loyalty.
  • Profits over work-life balance.
  The healthcare industry is subject to constant change. Although advancements in medicine are needed, they should not overshadow those who provide care. Prioritizing the personal and financial well-being of physicians is the first step to overcoming the burnout crisis.  

9 Signs it’s Time to Refinance Student Loan Debt

  NOTICE: Third Party Web Sites Education Loan Finance by SouthEast Bank is not responsible for and has no control over the subject matter, content, information, or graphics of the websites that have links here. The portal and news features are being provided by an outside source – The bank is not responsible for the content. Please contact us with any concerns or comments.
Intern making a good impression in front of coworkers
2018-11-12
How to Turn Your Internship into a Full-Time Career

Congratulations! You’ve got an internship and you want to get the best return on the time invested there - you want a job. Get your career started, make some real money and start paying off those student loans. By simply having an internship you’ve increased your chances because companies often hire the interns they like. What separates the interns they hire from the ones they don’t? We’ve got a few tips here to help you keep your foot in the door.  

Be more than present.

  There’s a balance between knowing when to speak up and when not to, but for the most part, it’s better to speak than to not. Be part of the conversation in meetings. Ask questions and throw out your opinion when appropriate. There’s nothing more unattractive to a potential employer than an intern that does little more than take oxygen out of the room.  

Figure out where you can help.

  Try and be a part of the team. Sometimes a company has a well-established intern program. Sometimes they don’t. Sometimes employees are too busy to find things for you to do. The best thing to do is find out how you can contribute. When you notice someone is overwhelmed, see how you can help. Having made someone's day easier and more productive can really help set you apart when management decides what if any interns are hired.  

Get to know people.

  Interns can often fly under the radar at a workplace. You should make a concerted effort to get to know people and what they do. If at the end of your time, most people around the office don’t even know your name, that’s going to really lessen your chances of getting an offer. That’s why it’s important to try to make an impression outside of the couple of people you normally come into contact with.  

If you’re fetching coffee - do it well.

  Sometimes being an intern can mean doing somewhat menial tasks like getting lunch or coffee, setting up for meetings, or running errands. Whatever the task, do them well. Often employers will have interns do these things to see how competent and enthusiastic they are. If you do it well, you’ll probably get more important tasks. Conversely, if you are only getting coffee and that’s all they ever want you for, it might not be the best place to work.  

Put the phone down.

  Be active and engaged at the internship. Don’t pull out your phone to go through social streams or answer emails. Even if you see other people in a meeting do it. It’s a bad habit that many of us have, and if you want them to know you care about what is going on you’ll avoid it.  

Ask Questions

  As an intern, it can be tough to stand out. By asking questions to your supervisor or while in a meeting it’ll help to make you stand out. In addition, you’ll learn more about the industry or topic being discussed. Don’t be afraid to ask a question if you need clarity.  

Think for yourself.

  Employers want to see that you can solve problems. That doesn’t mean you can’t ask questions. But at least try and figure things out beforehand. Sometimes a good Google search can do a lot. Whatever you do, don’t avoid the task because you couldn’t figure out how to do it.  

Don’t just punch the clock.

  If you really want to show people you want to be there, don’t head for the door at the first possible minute every day. Come in early and stay late from time to time. Show people you’re not just there because you have to be, but because you want to be.  

Make sure it’s the right fit.

  Don’t just take a job to take a job. It probably won’t be good for the company or your career. An internship is a great way for you to learn about a business or industry. It’s also a way for a company to evaluate you, but you should also be doing an evaluation. By the end of your time there if it doesn’t feel right, look for something else. Your internship experience may help you get a job someplace better suited to you.  

Set Goals for Yourself

  Being an intern, there really aren’t any expectations as to what you can do. Be sure to do your best and set personal goals for yourself. Goal setting will help to keep you busy even when there may not be work provided to you. Setting personal goals is a great habit to start and will help you as you further your career.   Regardless of the industry, your internship may be in - be sure to work hard. Hard work pays off as the old saying states. Hard work is just one part of everything that we’ve touched on here, but all of these habits are needed. The younger you can start these habits the better off you will be moving forward. If your internship doesn’t turn into a full-time job opportunity don’t be too disappointed and use it as a stepping stone. If you didn’t like your internship and you were offered a job, be sure to think it over. You don’t want to be working at a job you aren’t happy with. Good luck with your continued professional journey!    

Resume Tips from Hiring Managers

   
Woman working at home
2018-11-07
5 Benefits Millennials Look For in Employers

Millennial employees are known for changing jobs faster than other generations, so it’s no wonder Millennial turnover costs the U.S. economy $30.5 billion annually. But instead of writing off this segment of employees, many companies are looking at what drives people in this generation to join a company, and how can you keep the younger allstars once they’re on your team? Many Millennials have college degrees with varied backgrounds and experiences, they’re loyal to causes they care about and connected in their communities. Keeping top talent is a key business driver for success, but there are some things you might not know that Millennials are looking for in employers.  

Opportunity for Advancement

Millennials don’t want to get into one position and stay there forever. After seeing their loyal parents ousted from companies during the recession, young employees know not to settle and let skills stagnate. They might even leave for other opportunities, but you can attract and retain the best of them by offering development opportunities and continuing education. Millennials want to know that they can grow with the company and they won’t get stuck in one position. As a matter of fact, 59% of Millennials say this is extremely important to them.  

The State of Student Loan Debt in America Today 

 

Support

Nothing is more frustrating than working in a space or with a team that doesn’t support you. Millennials want to be somewhere that they feel supported. Whether that’s the right computer for their job, a sit-to-stand desk, ergonomic work chair, or regular check-ins from leadership, support is crucial.  

Work-Life Balance

Most would say it is not considered admirable to work a 60-hour workweek or to skip using your vacation time, because you’re that valuable. Millennial employees have no interest in being the first to the office and the last to leave because a work-life balance has become a mantra for this generation. Keep in mind these young workers had parents who were not as available for family time, and they are choosing instead to spend more time with their families or to disconnect from work to recharge their batteries. Since everyone is reachable through digital tools 24/7 getting away from the office and finding other ways to put work-life balance in harmony is crucial to avoiding burnout and keeping the best talent.  

Recognition and Feedback

Some people balk at the Millennials for having gotten participation trophies as kids, but the result is this generation likes to be recognized for good work and need more feedback to feel secure. Whereas a typical Baby Boomer might be happy assuming things are fine if they aren’t getting criticism, a Millennial would likely want regular status updates from their boss. They usually want to be doing things that are meaningful and helping the team progress, so things like a weekly meeting or quick one-on-one session to talk about goals can really go a long way to helping your top Millennial talent stay engaged. Plus, giving your Millennial employees props for their good work can be more effective than other types of perks or bonuses. 68% of Millennials said they’d prefer being personally called out for their efforts.  

Meaningful Perks

It’s a common misconception that all you need to attract and retain Millennials are things like pizza parties and bean bag chairs. In reality, they want more meaningful perks than this. Time off means more to them than raises because they’re driven to see the world and connect with other cultures. Options like bonuses that go straight to their student loans or more competitive benefits packages can be the difference between staying at your company or jumping ship for a competitor.  

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